Loyola University Chicago Libraries

Arrupe College: Newspapers & Media

News and Media Bias Resources

US Newspapers

International Newspapers

Television News

Online Newspaper Subscriptions

Wall Street JournalPlease CLICK HERE to register for an account before attempting to access this resource The Wall Street Journal is the world's leading business publication with coverage from 1984 to the current year.

New York Times Website : Loyola students, faculty, and staff have unlimited access to NYTimes.com, including archives from 1851 to the present (articles from 1923 to 1980 are limited to five per day per user; unlimited access is available through ProQuest Newstream). First time users need to create an account from this link Create a New Account to gain access. Returning users can log in from the New York Times' website from this link. Users will have to "renew" their account once a year with their same login information.

What is Media Bias?

Bias is "a particular tendency, trend, inclination, feeling, or opinion" about someone or something. When we discuss bias in media in the US, we are generally referring to conservative (also known as right) v. liberal (also known as left) bias, though there are many more ways to be biased and no one is truly free of bias.

INTERACTIVE Media Bias Chart

Organizations

Background Resources

Social Media Analytics

How is Media Bias Different from Fake News?

Bias differs from fake news in that fake news is specifically untrue. Biased sources don't necessarily use lies, they just don't include the whole picture, only using the facts that support their viewpoint. By using only the facts that support their cause they are giving an incomplete and therefore inaccurate picture.

What is Fake News?

Fake news is what it sounds like, stories that are published that are not based on facts. The aim of most fake news stories is to make money. Fake news stories have exciting titles that lure people to click on a link--which makes money. In print, sensational headlines sell tabloids.